What you need to know about Monday’s solar eclipse

This photo provided by Bob Baer and Sarah Kovac, participants in the Citizen CATE Experiment, shows a "diamond ring" shape during the 2016 total solar eclipse in Indonesia. For the 2017 eclipse over the United States, the National Science Foundation-funded movie project nicknamed Citizen CATE will have more than 200 volunteers trained and given special small telescopes and tripods to observe the sun at 68 locations in the exact same way. The thousands of images from the citizen-scientists will be combined for a movie of the usually hard-to-see sun’s edge. (R. Baer, S. Kovac/Citizen CATE Experiment via AP)

Do you really need those special eclipse glasses? Can you make your own viewing device with simple household items? How much of the eclipse will you be able to see if you’re watching it in Central Pennsylvania?

Linda Powell, museum educator and planetarium director at the State Museum of Pennsylvania appeared on Daybreak Friday to answer your questions.

The museum is hosting a special planetarium show. For more information, click here.

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