Lebanon County Teacher Chills Out for her Students

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For third
grade teacher Jennifer Reigle, her comfort zone is a classroom full of
energetic, inquiring minds in a climate controlled environment.

But, in preparation
for temporarily stepping out of her comfort zone, Reigle last week led her
students at Ebenezer Elementary School in simplified experiments with ice,
similar to those she conducted the week of February 10 through February 14 at
Lake Placid, New York.

“What I
will be doing is taking some of the ice from the Lake up there to look at the
different layers and to study what each of the layers means,” explained
Reigle, showing her cup of layered ice to her class.

Reigle is
one of only twenty teachers in the nation chosen to participate in a hands-on,
teacher-as-scientist workshop hosted by NASA.

“I am
thrilled that I can have the first hand knowledge for myself,” she said.
“To be able to go up there and experience a week of this and to bring
those experiences back to my students.”

From along
lake-side ice falls and in hand-dug snow pits, the educators worked side by
side with experts in chryospheric science, the study of snow and ice and how
they impact global climate. The data collecting techniques they used were some
of those used globally to validate data observed by NASA satellites. Mrs.
Reigle's kids stayed involved in her mission through email, skype and photo
updates from the field.

Third grader
Alex Long was excited to hear about his teacher's field trip.

“I'm
looking forward to learning more about the layers of ice,” he said.

And for
Kylie Breen, the lessons learned by these experiments are not likely to be
forgotten anytime soon.

“I'm
going to maybe put them in a book and maybe put them somewhere,” said
Breen. “And when I get older, I can look back at them and see what I
learned.”

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