Staying healthy and happy during the holidays

(Image 1)

As the sun sets earlier and the holiday eating season is here, your waistline and brain could take as hit.

“There is some evidence that with less sunlight, daylight, people become more depressed and feel the blues,” Mechanicsburg psychologist Dr. John Gavazzi said.

There are ways to beat the blues, among them exercise. Most people wait until January 1 to make the “more exercise” resolution, but it doesn't take long to slip into the gym-skipping habit.

“People loose focus, and that's usually the problem with New Year's commitments: they are focused for a brief period of time. There is nothing that really anchors in the motivation to keep them going in that positive direction,” Gavazzi said.

Gavazzi says start today, make a commitment and stick with it. Put a body sculpting plan into action.

“Everyone comes in, hops on cardio and expects that to be what's going to be their savior for weight loss, and it's not,” Gold's Gym trainer Lewis Reese said. “We have to make sure we strength train properly.”

Matt Rosenberg sought the help and says he muscled up when he teamed up with a trainer.

“I found an immediate change,” Rosenberg said. “I'm a skinny guy to begin with. I lost 10 pounds off the bat and started adding a little muscle.”

Know your body's mass index, which is a calculation of your height and weight. A healthy BMI requires healthy eating and exercise.

“Most people recommend that you get at least 30 minutes once a day of just being actively moving, and that's important,” Dr. Peter Kang of Allbetter Care said.

Hitting the gym or just finding time to work out makes a difference.

“I try to come every day in the morning; cardio, yoga, all senior classes,” 74-year-old Joyce Green said.

Pat Tasken, who enjoys working out, says exercise is beneficial.

“It's keeps you moving and mentally young and helps with your concentration,” Tasken said.

 

blog comments powered by Disqus