Linglestown Army Illustrator Recalls Pen and Paper Weaponry

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When
Linglestown artist Tim Wallace finished jump school with the 82nd Airborne
Division in 1987, he had hoped for deployment in Europe as an illustrator. The
Army thought otherwise.

“I
remember, it was, come here knucklehead. Congratulations!,” chuckled Wallace.
“You're going to a combat unit. I was like, 'okay.' “

His unit was
Psychological Operations. His primary weapon, a pen

“As it
turned out, my assignment was the best possible place to be,” he
reflected. “I was at the cutting edge of world events as they were
happening.”

From the
front lines of U.S. Operations in Central and South America, Panama and the
first Gulf War, Wallace opened fire with leaflets, posters and cartoons aimed
at the enemy.

“I
recognized then that the type of unit I was with, if we did our job right, it
could save U.S. lives,” said Wallace.

During his
down time, Wallace created a cartoon strip called “G.I. Bill.” a
humorous and satirical look at Army life through the eyes of a lowly private.
His cartoon style was compared by many to legendary World War Two Army
illustrator Bill Mauldin. Throughout his four year hitch, Wallace's work earned
him numerous commendations and medals, including the Army Meritorious Award.

And
recently, after a 20 year teaching career, Wallace published some of his army
illustrations, and donated original prints to military museums around the
country, including the Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle.

Inspired by
the feedback from his book and museum visitors, Wallace is currently at work on
a graphic novel aimed at the struggles of today's soldiers.

“I'm
going to touch upon the good things in my new book” said Wallace.
“The positive things. Things that we share, that we fondly remember. But,
also how do we deal with the stuff we don't want to remember.”

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